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Voting Restrictions in Mississippi 

Voting laws in Mississippi make it extremely difficult to vote outside of in-person on Election Day, hampering the freedom to vote and inhibiting hard-working Americans from voting their values. 

 

Here is a list of rules that you’ll need to know in order for your vote to count in Mississippi’s elections. 

  • In person, day-of voting is the only option available to the majority of citizens in the state.

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  • Polls are only open between the hours of 7am-7pm, creating long lines and providing only narrow windows for people to vote before or after work without having to arrive late or leave early.

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  • In order to be eligible for absentee voting, a person must meet one of six criteria:

    • The voter will be outside of his or her home county on Election Day.

    • The voter is a "student, teacher or administrator at a school whose studies or employment there necessitates" absence from the voter's home county on Election Day.

    • The voter is disabled and therefore unable to vote in person.

    • The voter is the parent, spouse or dependent of a disabled person "who is hospitalized outside of [his or her] county of residence or more than 50 miles away" and will be with the disabled person on Election Day.

    • The voter is 65 years old or older.

    • The voter is required to be at work on Election Day during polling hours.

  • Both the application for an absentee ballot and the ballot itself must be notarized.

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  • Voter registration must be completed 30 days prior to the election. Same day registration is not allowed. 

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  • Early or mail-in voting is not permitted, excepting absentee ballots.

Getting your vote to count in Mississippi is tough, especially if you have something keeping you away from the polls on Election Day. If you have questions on how to cast your vote, contact the Election Protection Hotline at 866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683) for help. 

 

In the meantime, we need to take action to make sure Mississippi counts hard-working Americans’ vote.